Howard Gardner Interview

May 1st, 2011 by Lewis Frumkes

truth-beauty-and-goodness-reframed

Howard Gardner, one of America’s greatest cognitive psychologists and thinkers has made his reputation primarily on MI theory, or the theory of multiple intelligences at least that is what most people want to talk to him about.  Gardner, however, while still interested in MI theory prefers to talk about his new work, namely his latest book called “Truth, Beauty, and Goodness Reframed: Educating for the virtues of the 21st century.”  Fortunately for listeners anything Gardner talks about is fascinating. . .so tune in and hear us banter about the new virtues: truth, beauty, and goodness, or the virtues as Gardner defines them. You won’t be disappointed and maybe you will be improved.

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Frank Wilczeck Interview

April 10th, 2011 by Lewis Frumkes

the-lightness-of-being

Frank Wilczeck won the Nobel Prize for Physics in 2004 for work he had done on asymptotic freedom with the strong force. He was also one of the discoverers of electrochromodynamics, and anyons. The prize was awarded for work Wilczeck had done when he was 21 years old at Princeton. I spent some time with Frank talking about all the things on my mind about cosmology and origins, and Frank patiently answered me with thoughtful and articulate responses. He is bright and one of the few physicists who also has the talent to translate arcane mathematical equations and physics into language an intelligent lay person can understand. Please join us for this show. . . I think you will enjoy it.

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Freeman Dyson Interview

December 27th, 2009 by Lewis Frumkes

disturbing-the-universe

Freeman Dyson who has long been a legend at The Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton is a theoretical physicist and mathematician of the first order, a futurist, and a nuclear engineer. British by birth, Dyson studied with Hans Bethe at Cornell before moving to the Institute for Advanced Study.  He is probably best known for demonstrating in 1949 the equivalence of the formulations of quantum electrodynamics that existed at the time— Feynman’s diagrammatic path integral formulation and the operator method developed by Julian Schwinger and Sin-Itiro Tomonaga for which Schwinger, Feynman, and Tomonaga shared the Nobel Prize. Dyson also did seminal work in topology, analysis, number theory, random matrices and other abstruse topics in mathematics.  On first meeting him Dyson can seem a tad eccentric, subversive, perfectionistic and cantankerous. . . but ultimately with his impish little smile he comes across as quite charming. When I asked him of all the scientists with whom he worked whom he thought possessed true genius, he unhesitatingly answered. . . Richard Feynman.

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